MOSIC in the media for Osteopathy Awareness Week 2018

MOSIC has featured in the news several times this week as part of Osteopathy Awareness Week (15–21 April). Our director, Dr Shane Buntman, appeared as a guest on a live Sky News interview last Sunday.

And in this article from The Age on Monday, a longtime MOSIC client credits Osteopathy with getting his back pain under control after surgery on a ruptured disc. You can read the full article here:

The one thing you’re forgetting in your workout

Do you have any stories about how Osteopathy has helped you overcome injury or achieve your goals? We’d love to find out. Please feel free to send us an email or contact us on social media with your stories.

  @/mosic_osteopathy_pilates/

 

@Dr_Osteopathy

 

  @MelbourneOsteopathySportsInjuryCentre/

 


Osteopathy Awareness Week helps the community by sharing stories about how Osteopathy can assist people in overcoming injuries and achieving their health and wellbeing goals.

If you would like to find out more about how we can help you achieve yours, then please feel free to ask a question or contact us on:

Active April 2018 at MOSIC

 

April is such an exciting time of the year for the MOSIC community. It signals the beginning of our Active April campaign, part of a fantastic state government initiative whose aim is to ‘promote healthy and active lifestyles and get Victorians to join in the fun of increased physical activity.’ This year MOSIC is offering a number of FREE events as well as participating as an organisation.

Visit the Premier’s Active April website to find out more or sign up for you or your organisation.

For MOSIC, this means taking health and wellbeing to the next level. This year we will be focusing on three key elements to help deliver the best version of ourselves to the MOSIC community, every single day during April:

  • Exercising and moving every day
  • Further refining our healthy eating habits
  • Developing our mindfulness skill set

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Eating fat doesn’t make you fat

Explaining why the popular misconception “if you eat fat, you’ll get fat” has contributed to the obesity epidemic

Fat is one of the body’s most basic building blocks, comprising about 15% of our overall weight. In our diet, fat (from animal or vegetable sources) provides a concentrated energy source. Contrary to popular belief, a fairly high percentage of diverse, good quality fats are required for optimal health. Although now slowly changing, for several decades now, a lot of health advice has unfairly promoted a low-fat diet. The problem with this is that it almost always equates to a high-sugar and/or high-refined carbohydrate diet that contributes to insulin resistance, obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and numerous other health problems.

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

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