Diet and Osteopathy

A wise man once said: “He who thinks he has no time for healthy eating will sooner or later have to find time for illness.” It should come as no real surprise that in terms of tissue healing and injury prevention, the role of a healthy diet is pivotal. You may recall that last week’s blog post discussed the role of inflammation on tissue healing and also touched on the topic of food allergies and their relationship to pain. In addition to allergies, the food and drink you put in to your body each day can also have a direct impact on your musculoskeletal system by causing inflammation and delayed tissue healing times.

In your initial consultation at MOSIC you may remember being asked about your diet: How many meals do you eat each day? Do you prepare your own food or eat out? Do you drink coffee or tea? How much water do you drink each day? And so on. While this information may seem irrelevant for a musculoskeletal complaint, as Osteopaths it is a crucial element in helping you recover from you injury and prevent further damage down the track.

Healthy Diet

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Medical History Explained: Allergies

Melbourne at this time of year is at the height of hay-fever season. Runny noses, itchy eyes and dry throats are all on the rise. It should come as no surprise to hay-fever sufferers that allergies effect the entire body and, more importantly, the body’s ability to heal itself.

In your initial consultation at Melbourne Osteopathy Sports Injury Centre you may remember being asked about allergies, and if you have any food intolerances. At the time, this might have seemed odd, particularly if your visit was regarding neck or back pain or some other musculoskeletal complaint. But there is an important link that deserves explaining.

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Medical History Explained: Workstation Ergonomics

It’s no exaggeration to say that many office workers spend more time sitting at a desk than they do at home these days. With the standard 9 to 5 office hours rapidly becoming extinct, it is not uncommon for workers to sit for up to 15-hours each day. Studies have shown that the average Australian sits 10-hours per day including 7.7-hours at work, and the remainder ploughing through emails, eating or catching up on social media at home. So how are these types of patterns important for your medical history?

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