My prenatal Pilates experience – week 20

Having taught and practiced Pilates for around 8 years now, my body has always been rather consistent. Even when there’s a bit of tightness in my shoulders and neck or a slight twinge in my knee, my body has always felt reliable.

My pregnancy thus far has been quite smooth sailing (touch wood), with no morning sickness and only a little bit of fatigue. However, after hitting the 20 week mark with my baby bump beginning to take shape, a couple of new niggles have developed that my body wasn’t used to. The most prominent being a tightness in my coccyx (tailbone) and sit-bones (the two boney points that we sit on). These niggles were constant, whether standing, bending over or even just trying to find a comfortable position sitting on the couch.

Read more

Exercise During Pregnancy

Falling pregnant is a magical time in a woman’s life but it can also be quite overwhelming. There is a huge amount of information to take in and a host of regular medical appointments to attend. A common misconception is that if you haven’t engaged in exercise pre-pregnancy, then it isn’t safe to start. This has recently been shown to be incorrect and current guidelines actually recommend pregnant women stay active, provided they have clearance from their doctor or obstetrician. After all, pregnancy is a normal condition and not an illness!

During the first trimester many women feel too unwell to participate in their regular exercise program. This is completely normal and it is very important to listen to your body during this time. With hormone levels fluctuating, a regular workout completed one day might feel almost impossible the next. By allowing your body to guide you, it will gradually become easier to keep exercising throughout your pregnancy.

Pregnancy

Things to take into consideration during pregnancy:

Read more

Pregnancy: A Window of Opportunity for Musculoskeletal Repair

With pregnancy come significant changes to a woman’s physiology and biomechanics that can pose a challenge for soon-to-be mums. There is often a focus on the potentially injurious outcomes of pregnancy, however the same hormonal changes that are responsible for back and pelvic pain also provide a unique potential for healing longstanding or chronic musculoskeletal injuries.

Read more