Training for your first triathlon in just 4 weeks

Summer in Australia means it’s triathlon season. For anyone who has said they’d like to complete a triathlon one day, if you act now you’ve still got time to prepare for your race this season!

You might be thinking ‘there’s no way I can prepare in time’. But I assure this is not the case. Even if you haven’t even been running regularly over the holiday season or can’t remember the last time you rode a bike, there’s no need to stress out!  You CAN do it.

I’ve prepared the following tips and a basic training plan that you can use to get ready for your first race, in only 4 weeks. Triathlons come in many different distances, so choose something appropriate for your experience. Common triathlon formats include:

  • Sprint Distance: 500–750m swim, 20km cycle, 3–5km run
  • Olympic Distance: 1500m swim, 40km cycle, 10km run
  • Triathlon 70.3 (Half Ironman): 1900m swim, 90km cycle, 21.1km run
  • Triathlon 140.6 (Ironman): 3900m swim, 180km cycle, 42.2km run

In this post, I’ll be outlining a basic training plan for your first sprint distance event.

Whilst I have a background in training, competing both as a swimmer and a triathlete when I was 16, the last time I raced was 7 years ago. Since then I’ve made very few attempts at serious swimming or cycling. However, with some gentle persuasion and encouragement from senior Osteopath and mentor, Brendan O’Loughlin, I was convinced to give it another go. Unfortunately, the timing of the event left me with just 4 weeks to get ready, so this is what I did to prepare for my first sprint distance triathlon in over 7 years…

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Returning to Training After a Break

At Melbourne Osteopathy Sports Injury Centre, we have a special interest in treating athletes of all types, from weekend warriors to elite sportspeople. Many of our practitioners also compete at a high level. Many of you may not know that Dr Catherine Allison is not just a talented Osteopath but was also awarded the 2015 Female Athlete of the Year by Triathlon Victoria. Catherine acts as an ambassador for specialty sports-bra retailer She Science and posted a great article on their blog this month that deals with returning back to training after the Christmas/New Year break.

With January now just a memory and February almost done too, this article offers some great advice for those people now ready to get back to full fitness after the holiday break.

You can read the full article here:

http://blog.shescience.com.au/a-guide-to-returning-to-training-after-a-break/

Catherine Allison

Am I unfit or is it just hot?

Heat-running

A COMMON SENSE APPROACH FOR TRAINING IN THE HEAT.

I write this blog in Melbourne, where in recent months the weather has been a roller coaster as can be expected. One day it’s high 30’s and the next it’s below 20 degrees. On multiple occasions I have had athletes producing ordinary bike and poor run sessions in the hotter conditions. They leave me concerning feedback that their fitness has all of a sudden declined which is simply untrue. Unfortunately, they do not take into consideration how much of an affect the hotter weather has on their bodies performance. Read more

A Healthier Life for All: Interview with Triathlete Dan Kelly

Every day at Melbourne Osteopathy Sports Injury Centre we genuinely relate what we are doing to creating a ‘a healthier life for all’. This phrase is a large part of the vision that everyone at our Centre has agreed to work towards achieving each and every day. The phrase ‘a healthier life for all’ is our promise to our community. It is the drive behind our core values:

  1. Customer Service Excellence
  2. Clinical Excellence
  3. Leadership

Without a vision, we risk a journey without any real purpose or direction, as famously quoted by Helen Keller:

‘The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision.’

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Why Is My Swimming Not Improving?

Swimming is a very technical sport and a sound technique generally cannot be self-taught. Unless you were lucky enough to have mum and dad throw you in the ‘deep end’ at a young age, getting a grasp of correct swimming technique can be a daunting and lengthy task. The fact is that no-one has perfect technique (well maybe some Olympians are an exception), and everyone can improve their swim technique through proper coaching.

4 Reasons why your swim may not be improving

Firstly, take a look at this video of Sun Yang, the 1500m world record holder. As you read the common mistakes below, come back and view this video to see the correct technique.

These are some of the most common mistakes I see with triathletes and/or leisure swimmers, and some insights into how you may address them.  Read more

Identifying and Treating Sports Injuries – Lessons Learnt

I write this article in the hope of providing some insight into how and why overtraining can occur, and how to identify this early on to ensure you are not injured for a prolonged period.

I will commence this post with 3 questions:

  1. Have you had an injury that’s hindered your training/racing?
  2. If so, do you know how and why the injury occurred?
  3. Thirdly and most importantly, do you now know how to avoid this type of injury reoccurring in the future?

 

If you answered no to question 1 then you are extremely fortunate and questions 2 and 3 are irrelevant. If you answered yes to question 1, but no to either 2 or 3 then this is definitely a concern.

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Triathlon Time Trial Series: Part 2 – Interview With Triathlon Coach Ryan Bourke

In Part 2 of this series focusing on the bike Time Trial leg of  Triathlon we are presenting an interview with Ryan Bourke, a 27 year old rising star in domestic triathlon, marketing manager at Tri Alliance, high performance triathlon coach, and all round good guy. Ryan will provide some insight into what it takes to be one of the top riding age-group and open-category triathletes in Australia.

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Triathlon Time Trial Series: Part 1 – Differences Between Cycling and Triathlon Time Trials

Bicycle time trailing in Triathlon and Road Cycling are quite distinct. The main difference is that in a triathlon you need to jump off the bike and run after the cycling leg, whilst after a fast road cycling time trial, you should probably be too fatigued to walk, let alone run, afterwards. You can read some other informative posts on running and triathlon warm-up routines on our blog too.

The intensity of the cycle effort needs to be less for a given distance in a triathlon compared to a cycling time trial. The position on the bike also needs to be different to account for correct running posture and the different muscles required. Despite these facts, plenty of triathletes set up their time trial bikes with little distinguishing features from a traditional road cycling time trial position.

 

Relaxed vs. Aggressive Bicycle Position Read more

The Recovery Phase of Training

It is now the off season for triathlon in the southern hemisphere. This is otherwise known as the transition or recovery phase of training. For the large majority of triathletes this means it’s time to rejuvenate and recover both physically and mentally. No matter when your key races occur (whether it be Cairns in June or Shepparton in Nov), the recovery phase is an essential part of any training program. For those who commenced racing in October and have continued through to March, it has been a long road. Here are my 8 tips for the triathlon recovery phase. These tips refer to triathlon however they can be adopted by anyone competing in individual swimming, cycling or running or team sports that require a large amount of commitment.

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