Running – Training principles & injury prevention

As an Osteopath who has worked with many competitive and recreational runners over the years, I’ve come to recognise some of the most common causes of injuries:

  • Overload: Increasing training too rapidly or training at too high a volume.
  • Poor recovery: Inadequate rest, sleep or nutrition.
  • Biomechanics: A huge can of worms!
  • Other: Possibly a can and possibly a worm, but not yet clear.

In this article, I’ll be examining Overload and Recovery because that’s where things are most clear and where we can advise most accurately.

By following correct training principles, I believe that we can prevent most running injuries.

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Overuse Injuries

With Run Melbourne only 3 weeks away, here at Melbourne Osteopathy Sports Injury Centre, our team is hard at work keeping people moving in the right direction to meet their goals for this event. Many of the more common complaints rearing their head at this time in a runner’s build are those known as overuse injuries.

Run Melbourne

Overuse injuries occur at the musculotendinous junction – the area of muscle where it becomes tendinous and generally attaches to a bone. In most instances, overuse injuries affect tendons and occur when the load from exercise is too great for the body to adapt and repair in time for the next workout. Read more

Pilates is Your Body’s Best Insurance Policy

A great article posted on the mypilatesinfo.com website earlier this year offers a great explanation of exactly what Pilates is and how it can be used to keep your body strong and healthy and prevent all the unnecessary wear and tear on joints that can occur when your muscles become unbalanced.Studio Pilates

Pilates is about strengthening your core. But the point of creating and maintaining a strong core isn’t just so you can do more advanced Pilates work. The goal is to have a strong core and proper alignment so your body functions properly and you can do all those activities you love for the rest of your life.

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The Melbourne Marathon Festival…Are You Competing?

With under five weeks to go until the annual Melbourne Marathon, the biggest marathon in Australia, an increasing number of Melbournians are now out and about running.

With a large selection of event choices available, all the way from the full 42km run to a 3km walk, it’s easy to see how this event has gone from just 2000 competitors in 1978, to over 35,000 in more recent years.

Coming across these people whilst running around the “Tan” or along the Yarra River, I often wonder what sort of training they are doing to prepare themselves for the event? And are they complementing their running with some sort of strength and stability training?

Marathon (edited) Read more

Running-Induced Fatigue and Core Endurance

Recent Articles with Dr Brendan O’Loughlin

Kinematic changes during running-induced fatigue and relations with core endurance in novice runners

This study aimed to investigate kinematic (movement) changes experienced during running-induced fatigue. Further, the study examined relations between kinematic changes and core endurance. The study included 17 participants which isn’t a very large sample group, however it did produce some interesting findings.

You can access the article via PubMed at the link below:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23790535

Mo Farah running with upright posture compared to Hayle Ibrahimov with trunk flexion.

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Triathlon Time Trial Series: Part 1 – Differences Between Cycling and Triathlon Time Trials

Bicycle time trailing in Triathlon and Road Cycling are quite distinct. The main difference is that in a triathlon you need to jump off the bike and run after the cycling leg, whilst after a fast road cycling time trial, you should probably be too fatigued to walk, let alone run, afterwards. You can read some other informative posts on running and triathlon warm-up routines on our blog too.

The intensity of the cycle effort needs to be less for a given distance in a triathlon compared to a cycling time trial. The position on the bike also needs to be different to account for correct running posture and the different muscles required. Despite these facts, plenty of triathletes set up their time trial bikes with little distinguishing features from a traditional road cycling time trial position.

 

Relaxed vs. Aggressive Bicycle Position Read more

The Recovery Phase of Training

It is now the off season for triathlon in the southern hemisphere. This is otherwise known as the transition or recovery phase of training. For the large majority of triathletes this means it’s time to rejuvenate and recover both physically and mentally. No matter when your key races occur (whether it be Cairns in June or Shepparton in Nov), the recovery phase is an essential part of any training program. For those who commenced racing in October and have continued through to March, it has been a long road. Here are my 8 tips for the triathlon recovery phase. These tips refer to triathlon however they can be adopted by anyone competing in individual swimming, cycling or running or team sports that require a large amount of commitment.

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