Surgery or physical therapy?

Orthopaedic surgeon Victor van de Graaf speaks with Health Report host Dr Norman Swan about the choice between surgery and physical therapy for meniscal tears. Surprisingly, the health outcomes for both options are similar.

Photo by Alexander Redl on Unsplash

If you’ve ever had a serious knee problem, then this is well worth a listen (running time 6:47).

Health Report is a program on ABC Radio National. You can visit the episode website here: Surgery vs physical therapy for meniscal tears

You can download full audio for the episode on the ABC Radio National website here: Download audio (6:47)


If you would like to speak to Dr Jake Martin or one of our other practitioners about whether physical therapy (such as Osteopathy, Pilates or Remedial Massage) could help treat your knee injury, please feel free to ask a questioncontact us or email us at:

info@melbourneosteopathycentre.com.au

Pilates and the foam roller

It’s not just about pain.

Many people’s first thought, at the very mention of the ‘foam roller’, is a feeling of excruciating pain. Rolling the outside of your leg or your IT band can effortlessly bring on these types of sensations. Pilates sometimes make use of the foam roller for certain deep tissue release techniques (that can hurt), however there are many additional benefits. The foam roller can also be used to encourage both proprioception and stability.

Read more

Pilates equipment at MOSIC

No two things are alike, even if they may look the same…and Pilates equipment is no exception. Melbourne Osteopathy Sports Injury Centre utilises a wide range of premium Pilates equipment from reputable brands to provide our clients with a great experience that goes beyond what many average studios can offer.

We use equipment from Balanced Body, Pilates Equip and Peak Pilates at our studios. Our Collins Street studio even has a ‘classical’ reformer from Brooklyn, New York!

Read more

Pilates at home

One of the best aspects of the Pilates method is its portability. You don’t even have to be doing a Pilates workout to move in a ‘Pilates way’. Although the best results are generally gained from working in a studio under the watchful eye of a trained and experienced teacher, home-based workouts are a wonderful adjunct to studio sessions. They help reiterate the subject matter learnt in class and, if done regularly, provide the perfect combination of movements to iron out many of the kinks that modern living creates.

Read more

Pilates for beginners

For a new Pilates student, there is a lot to learn in the first 20 sessions. Setting up strong foundations is incredibly important to help advance along the Pilates journey.

There are six key principles that make up the foundations of the Pilates method. Their application is what makes Pilates such a unique and effective modality. It is vitally important that these are taught well for all new students:

Read more

Pilates for lower back pain

Lower back pain has become so common these days, that often it is not even diagnosed. The primary cause is poor standing – but more commonly sitting – posture. Prolonged periods spent seated in front of a computer, as well as slouching forward, have become normal. It is also very common to have a dominant side of the body – a side that we naturally use more than the other. This can lead to a strength or tension imbalance between the left or right sides, another big cause of lower back pain.

Pilates may help to correct these sorts of problems.

Read more

Pilates versus Yoga

Although completely different in intent, there are many cross-overs and benefits between Pilates and Yoga. Each lifestyle (or method) has proponents eager to tell you why their method is better than the other.

However, as with many things, deciding which will provide the most benefit is a complex combination of factors including: the particular body and personality in question; the various barriers to practice; and what the subject currently needs to help them get better, stronger, pain-free or simply find an improved sense of well-being.

Pilates vs Yoga Read more

Pilates for Seniors

Many blogs (including our own) suggest that Pilates is good for this and good for that and good for pretty much everything. Well, the truth is that Pilates is good, actually great, for almost everything and is beneficial for everyone, particularly older clients. At MOSIC we have been absolutely privileged to work with several clients into their late 80’s whose weekly Pilates sessions have allowed them to live independently and with a self-reported increase in daily confidence.

As we get older the once buoyant human body begins to becomes brittle, unstable and progressively more unreliable. Enter the Pilates method, our expert team and a fully equipped studio.

Pilates Read more

Hypermobility and Pilates – What does hypermobility actually mean?

We all live inside a different body. No two are exactly the same. Some are tall. Some short. They can be big- or small-boned. There are slow, heavy and fast-moving bodies. Toned and squishy bodies. Rather than pursuing a particular (and often unattainable) body type, the way to really explore our limits is to learn about our own particular type of body. The more we understand it, the more fun we can have with it!

Firstly, we need to identify the aspects of our bodies that don’t change, like the structure of our bones. A large-boned, seven-foot-tall person will remain tall their whole life, perhaps only shrinking a few centimetres in older age due to postural changes and normal disc height reduction.

But there are many other body traits that are changeable depending on how we live and what we do. The connectivity of our muscles, ligaments and tendons fit in to this category. Muscles have been described as the organs of the will – our mind can control them. We can use knowledge about the type of muscles we are born with to exploit this characteristic to make positive and lasting changes to them.

Some people’s muscles naturally hold a lot of tension. Others inherit muscles (and ligaments) that are more flexible and mobile – therapists often label them as hypermobile.

Hypermobility Read more

Improving your yoga poses

Have you ever joined a yoga class and wondered why you seem to be struggling more than the yogi next to you?

It might help to break the pose down into the elements required by each area of the body and work on them separately before putting it all together.

Here’s an example using the ‘extended side angle’ pose as performed by Pilates instructor Luisa Burgoyne.

As pictured below, this pose requires:

  • left hip flexion
  • right hip extension
  • spine rotation right
  • elevation of right shoulder

Yoga1 Read more