Eating fat doesn’t make you fat

Explaining why the popular misconception “if you eat fat, you’ll get fat” has contributed to the obesity epidemic

Fat is one of the body’s most basic building blocks, comprising about 15% of our overall weight. In our diet, fat (from animal or vegetable sources) provides a concentrated energy source. Contrary to popular belief, a fairly high percentage of diverse, good quality fats are required for optimal health. Although now slowly changing, for several decades now, a lot of health advice has unfairly promoted a low-fat diet. The problem with this is that it almost always equates to a high-sugar and/or high-refined carbohydrate diet that contributes to insulin resistance, obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and numerous other health problems.

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

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Medical History Explained: Diet and Osteopathy

A wise man once said: “He who thinks he has no time for healthy eating will sooner or later have to find time for illness.” It should come as no real surprise that in terms of tissue healing and injury prevention, the role of a healthy diet is pivotal. You may recall that last week’s blog post discussed the role of inflammation on tissue healing and also touched on the topic of food allergies and their relationship to pain. In addition to allergies, the food and drink you put in to your body each day can also have a direct impact on your musculoskeletal system by causing inflammation and delayed tissue healing times.

In your initial consultation at MOSIC you may remember being asked about your diet: How many meals do you eat each day? Do you prepare your own food or eat out? Do you drink coffee or tea? How much water do you drink each day? And so on. While this information may seem irrelevant for a musculoskeletal complaint, as Osteopaths it is a crucial element in helping you recover from you injury and prevent further damage down the track.

Healthy Diet

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Healthy Eating: Shopping, Food Preparation & Simple Meals

SmithFit training studio in South Yarra is an affiliate business of Melbourne Osteopathy Sports Injury Centre. Founder Shannon Smith is passionate about body recomposition and the studio uses customised software and medically approved pathology testing to assess the physiology and biochemistry of their clients. Shannon has a truly holistic approach to exercise and nutrition optimisation and has put together a series of videos about nutrition and healthy eating.

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Active April Blog: Habit Formation

With cold days now on the horizon it is essential that health and wellbeing become your highest priority. Active April is all about staying focused on what you have already achieved this year. This blog has and our monthly newsletter have already explained how motivation, commitment and drive can be used in your health journey. Now is the time to put all these changes into effect and stay strong during this time of temptation.

If someone offers you an extra piece of cake or chocolate or perhaps just one more drink, this maybe the time to think about it before saying “yes”. We should always ask: is it worth it? Will I be able to exercise tomorrow? Is this on my eating plan?

At Melbourne Osteopathy Sports Injury Centre we will help you stay focused and motivated, and teach you that movement is just as essential for your body to stay healthy as the food that you put in to it. If we can keep on track through April you are likely to have a successful, active and healthy winter. Read more

The Paleo Diet and Autoimmunity

Late last year I developed some troubling symptoms: severe fatigue, shortness of breath after light exercise, dizziness and a range of digestive symptoms. I also fell ill with several colds in the space of only a few months, which proved difficult to shake. Knowing a thing or two about the human body, I had an inkling that my blood iron levels might be low, so off I went for a blood test. As suspected, the results showed iron deficiency, along with iodine deficiency and also some low levels of autoimmune antibodies (which we will touch on shortly). Although these results explained my symptoms, the cause of the issues were not so clear.

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Food Cravings

Dr Natasha Paunovic found this article recently that explains what certain food cravings might be trying to tell you.

You can read the full article here.

“Intense food cravings can be a sign you’re deficient in certain nutrients.”

It covers all the classic cravings like chocolate, lollies, meat and carbs as well as some more obscure ones like ice and cheese.

If you would like to speak to Dr Natasha Paunovic or one of our other practitioners about your diet or any other aspect of your health, please feel free to ask a questioncontact us or email us at:

info@melbourneosteopathycentre.com.au

5 Tips For Achieving Optimal Health

1. Acquire Good Gut Health

Having a balance of good bacteria in your gut is essential for a strong immune system and overall wellbeing. A healthy gut will aid digestion, promote nutrient uptake, regular bowel movements and weight loss. Eating fermented foods such as sauerkraut, yoghurt and Kombucha will assist in the maintenance of the natural balance of microorganisms (microflora) in the intestines. Another great product is Apple Cider Vinegar.

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The Recovery Phase of Training

It is now the off season for triathlon in the southern hemisphere. This is otherwise known as the transition or recovery phase of training. For the large majority of triathletes this means it’s time to rejuvenate and recover both physically and mentally. No matter when your key races occur (whether it be Cairns in June or Shepparton in Nov), the recovery phase is an essential part of any training program. For those who commenced racing in October and have continued through to March, it has been a long road. Here are my 8 tips for the triathlon recovery phase. These tips refer to triathlon however they can be adopted by anyone competing in individual swimming, cycling or running or team sports that require a large amount of commitment.

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Understanding Overtraining Syndrome In Athletes – 10 Signs You May Be Overtraining

Athletes put their bodies under a certain amount of stress in order to increase performance. This is not only limited to professional athletes, but also amateur level athletes and those simply looking to increase their fitness levels. If the stress loads are appropriate, then performance will improve BUT if the stress loads are inappropriate then a state of overtraining/under recovery can occur.

Overtraining can be a physical, behavioural, and/or emotional condition that occurs when the volume and intensity of an individual’s training exceeds their recovery capacity. They cease making progress, and can even begin to lose strength and fitness. There are different levels of overtraining, so being aware of the signs of overtraining and the common causes and symptoms will help ensure your training does not head down this path.

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